The Purge, Live: Who, What, Where, When, and How?

I was recently asked by a fellow artist if I “still planned on taking The Purge live.” It wasn’t a strange question, but I had to respond with a more complicated version of “yes.”

I finished audio production for Waves around late October/early November. That was 6 months ago and I’ve, in the mean time, released three new The Purge songs but have yet to perform a live show. I’ve had some very talented musicians approach me about getting involved, but for various reasons I didn’t capitalize on the moment. Part of that is because I wasn’t 100% sure on what The Purge live was even going to be like.

We Are Sex Bob-omb

 There are many decisions to make when you try to take what is, essentially, a studio-oriented music project live; more-so than there are when you’re a more traditional band that writes and performs all their music together. How big of a production should this try to be? Will you need to try and produce accompanying video? How reliant will you need to be on backing audio (pre-recorded music or portions of music)? How many other musicians are in the band? How will you repay them for their time and commitment? Can you even afford to do that? What will you do about stage-lighting? What will the overall tone of your show be like? Which songs are crucial to your set-list and which ones aren’t? How long will your set be? The list goes on and on.

For the traditional band, live performance together is the creative process and recording is an after-thought. For projects like The Purge, recording is the creative process.

I <3 FL Studio. Thanks to Rebekah Pascouau Photography for the photo.

I <3 FL Studio. Thank you to Rebekah Pascouau Photography for this photo.

There are multiple routes I could take The Purge live. One extreme, and the perceivably quickest and easiest route would be to rely very heavily on backing audio and simply walk on stage myself. I would not be uncomfortable doing this, but I do feel like it might be a waste of resources and talent when I’ve had enough other musicians approach me about getting involved. I also know from my experience with my last project that working to organize a heavily automated performance by yourself is a pretty joyless chore when it comes time to adapt it, whereas a more organic approach has the ability to bend and be flexible.

The other extreme, and the most traditional approach, would be to assemble a committed group of 3-4 other musicians/artists and arrange the songs live so that backing tracks become wholly unnecessary. It may or may not come as a surprise to some readers, but I’ve never actually played my own music with a group like this. One fear I have about this approach boils down to what is, basically, a trust issue. I’ve talked to other artists like Edgar Graves of The Cemetery Boys about band structures and he’s always liked to keep his band small. His reasoning was that it’s, and I’m paraphrasing a little here, difficult to arrange the schedules of a group of other adults who have varying degrees of commitment to the project so that you can play shows and rehearse consistently.

Too Tired for Band Practice

But that isn’t to say I’m not above trying to make that happen, and it may even turn out that a few songs would require limited backing track use regardless of how many musicians are in the band.

Simply put, I won’t and can’t  know for sure what The Purge live will be like until I assemble my team. What I do know is, however, I would like to see The Purge performing consistent shows and performing them well by the end of the year, in whatever shape or form that may be. If you’ve ever talked to me about getting involved with the project live, expect a message from me by the end of next week. If you’re a musician who has thought about getting involved with the project live, please contact me.